Art

Ásmundarsafn and Yearning for Space

Visiting Iceland earlier in the year, I caught Yearning for Space at Ásmundarsafn in the few days before the exhibition closed. Yearning for Space is the name of an Ásmundur Sveinsson sculpture from 1967, and it indexes the time when the Space Race was at its peak: set off by the successful orbiting of Sputnik 1 in October 1957, after the Soviet Union…

The Einar Jónsson Sculpture Garden

Born at Galtafell farm in southern Iceland, Einar Jónsson studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen, settling in the Danish capital from 1904 following a couple of years spent mostly in Rome, with visits also to Berlin, Dresden, Munich, Vienna, and Florence. At the time, around the turn of the twentieth century, Iceland possessed little in…

Bringing Hieronymus Bosch Back Home: Visions of Genius

Last week in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, the city in the southern Netherlands where Hieronymus Bosch lived between 1450 and 1516, maintaining a studio on the market square where he painted the grotesque fantasies of heaven and hell which soon won him commissions from across Europe, a landmark exhibition opened to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the artist’s death. Only twenty-five paintings remain definitely attributed…

Daily Visual 06.02.16: KAWS at Yorkshire Sculpture Park

The first UK museum exhibition by the American artist KAWS opened today at Yorkshire Sculpture Park. The Longside Gallery plays host to KAWS’ vibrant acrylic canvases and smaller sculptures in fibreglass and wood, while dotted across the park’s 500 acres are six monumental sculptures in KAWS’ trademark style, cartoon figures as tall as ten feet, with crossed eyes and doleful postures. KAWS will…

Daily Visual 07.12.15: Assemble Win Turner Prize 2015

On Monday, at a ceremony from Glasgow’s Tramway which was broadcast live on Channel 4, the architectural collective Assemble won the Turner Prize 2015. Assemble are a loose collective of eighteen young artists, designers, and architects, who began working together in 2010 and share a studio in east London. They received their nomination for the Granby Four Streets project in Toxteth, part of inner…

Daily Visual 26.11.15: Vermeer’s The Little Street Located

Johannes Vermeer emerged around 1655, aged just twenty-three, and already fully formed as an artist. After a couple of historical works, by the end of the decade he had completed most of his best loved paintings: Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window is attributed to 1657, The Little Street and The Milkmaid to the following year, and the glorious View of Delft…

Daily Visual 11.11.15: Alexander Calder Performing Sculpture

On Wednesday, the major exhibition Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture opened at Tate Modern. The American sculptor remains one of the most recognisable figures in modern art as the originator of the ‘mobile’, a term coined by Marcel Duchamp for Calder’s dynamic sculptures, typically composed in painted sheet metal and wire and suspended elegantly in the air. Alexander Calder: Performing Sculpture will show…

Daily Visual 15.10.15: Burntwood School Wins Stirling Prize

At a ceremony in London on Thursday, Burntwood School in Wandsworth, London was awarded the RIBA Stirling Prize 2015. The project was designed by Allford Hall Monaghan Morris, and was completed in 2014 at a cost of £40.9 million. To original buildings retained from 1958, including two designed by Sir Leslie Martin, Allford Hall Monaghan Morris added six new buildings: four four-storey teaching…

Pyongyang Architecture: Eddo Hartmann and Matjaž Tančič

Korea was annexed by the Empire of Japan in 1910, and remained under Japanese rule until the close of World War II in August 1945. While the Allies had continued to vacillate on the fate of Korea come the end of the war, by August – as per an agreement between the two states – the United States occupied the southern half of…