Monthly Film

October Film: Carnival of Souls (1962)

  Carnival of Souls 83 minutes | 26 September 1962 | United States ‘Atmospheric 60s B-horror film with a cult following. Mary Henry is enjoying the day by riding around with two friends but everything goes wrong when challenged to a drag race and their car gets forced off of a bridge. The car sinks into the murky depths, and all three women…

September Film: The Stranger Analysis

The Stranger was the third Orson Welles directorial effort to see the light of day and the dark of cinema screens, following Citizen Kane (1941) and The Magnificent Ambersons (1942). Production lasted from late September until 21 November 1945, with the picture released the following July. Welles’ earliest take on film noir – preceding The Lady from Shanghai (1947), and Touch of Evil…

September Film: The Stranger (1946)

  The Stranger 95 minutes | 2 July 1946 | United States ‘Set in Connecticut after World War II, The Stranger is a cat and mouse game between Wilson (Edward G. Robinson), a member of the Allied War Crimes Commission and Franz Kindler (Orson Welles), a Nazi who has assumed the false identity of Dr. Charles Rankin. To complete his new intelligentsia disguise,…

August Film: Detour Analysis

The production of Edgar G. Ulmer’s 1945 film noir classic Detour is as fabled as the picture itself: reportedly shot over anything from two days up to four six-day weeks, on a small budget costing somewhere between $20,000 and $100,000. Ulmer himself, in an interview given in 1972, asserted that the film took six days to shoot. Yet it subsequently spent more than six…

August Film: Detour (1945)

  Detour 68 minutes | 30 November 1945 | United States ‘Man is involved in two freakish accidents that make him look like a murderer. Poverty row masterwork that is the most precise elucidation of the noir theme of explicit fatalism.’ – Spencer Selby Director: Edgar G. Ulmer Producer: Leon Fromkess Screenplay: Martin Goldsmith Based On: Martin Goldsmith’s 1939 novel Detour: An Extraordinary Tale Starring: Tom…

July Film: Battleship Potemkin Analysis

Battleship Potemkin, released at the end of 1925 as only Sergei Eisenstein’s second full-length film, was an elaboration on the real-life mutiny which took place on the battleship Potemkin in June 1905. The ship had been built for the Imperial Russian Navy’s Black Sea Fleet; and at the time, many of its senior officers were away, engaged in the ongoing…

July Film: Battleship Potemkin (1925)

  Battleship Potemkin («Бронено́сец „Потёмкин“») 74 minutes | 21 December 1925 | Soviet Union ‘Considered one of the most important films in the history of silent pictures, as well as possibly Eisenstein’s greatest work, Battleship Potemkin brought Eisenstein’s theories of cinema art to the world in a powerful showcase; his emphasis on montage, his stress of intellectual contact, and his treatment…