James Joyce

A Brief History of the Modern Man’s Hat

In the final decade of the eighteenth century, impelled by the ideals of the French Revolution, the top hat replaced the tricorne as the vogue item of headwear for fashionable Europeans. Already popular in France where it would become part of the costume of the Incroyables, the first top hat in England has been credited to the Frenchman George Dunnage, a master hatter…

George RR Martin and the Art of the List

On 10 May 2016 George RR Martin published an excerpt in the form of a chapter from The Winds of Winter, the sixth novel in his epic fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire and one which fans have been eagerly anticipating now for almost five years. A Dance with Dragons – itself the product of a five-and-a-half-year wait,…

Food in Fiction: Hot Peas and Vinegar in ‘Two Gallants’

The addition of a condiment can sometimes turn an insubstantial side into a hearty supper. In James Joyce‘s ‘Two Gallants’, Lenehan stops at a shop for something to eat: ‘He paused at last before the window of a poor-looking shop over which the words Refreshment Bar were printed in white letters. On the glass of the window were two flying inscriptions: Ginger…

Daily Visual 16.06.15: Bloomsday 2015

Bloomsday today in Dublin marks the culmination of a week-long series of events organised by The James Joyce Centre: from walking tours to pub crawls and high teas, readings, lectures, and interviews with celebrity admirers. As Joyce’s literature continues to flourish worldwide, Bloomsday is celebrated in ever more ways across a growing number of locations. Among other happenings in New…

Culturedallroundman Becomes Culturedarm: A Name Change

Over the past couple of days I have changed the name and the domain of this website – or in hosting parlance ‘migrated’ – from ‘Culturedallroundman.com’ to ‘Culturedarm.com’. The new name is shorter and potentially more inclusive; and I was already using it for my Twitter, Instagram, YouTube accounts and more. As the ‘About’ section of the site now belatedly…

The Open Letter and the UK General Election

The open letter is hardly an innovation as a means to publicise a message. The art of the epistle – letters bound by formal gestures, often written for some didactic purpose, and frequently sent to groups of people rather than individuals – flourished in ancient Egypt and on into ancient Greece and Rome. Cicero’s De Officiis, considered for much of Western…

Joyce, Nabokov, and Dirty Books: The Publications of Ulysses, Haveth Childers Everywhere, and Lolita

With Ezra Pound acting as intermediary, from the spring of 1918 until the close of 1920, James Joyce published the emerging episodes of Ulysses in The Little Review – the American avant-garde literary magazine founded by Margaret Anderson in 1914, and edited by Anderson and Jane Heap. Having made The Little Review his outlet of choice across 1917, becoming its foreign editor,…